Monday, March 29, 2010

Amateurs undercut Professionals

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/30/business/media/30photogs.html?hp

11 comments:

Cam said...

just like my cousin in Chicago.

hunter said...

:(

jackson said...

Got to find the right things to photograph then. I don't think I would enjoy shooting stock photography anyways, let the nobodies cover that. Id rather have my photography make a difference, if it does, it will be wanted, I'm not overly worried. I may not be saying that in things to come, hard to say, but if that's all it takes for me to quit then I don't belong here to begin with.

hunter said...

:)

merissalambert said...

This is too true! I have met around 5 people lately who "shoot weddings and portraits and stuff for really cheap", no education or professional equipment but people like that they are cheap. Oi!
This irritates me to no end, BUT I do try to remind myself: the people who hire me, do so for my talent and knowledge, not my price!
It is a tough world for photographers right now!

merissalambert said...
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merissalambert said...
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Megan E Thompson said...

Here's a link to responses... http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/30/pros-and-amateurs-debate-is-photography-in-trouble/

I don't think this article is any more true than in my industry. I'm 26 and considered "old" in the rock photography world. Luckily I got to LA at just the right time to carve a spot for myself. I would hate to be trying to break in right now. But labels and magazines keep cutting their budgets for photos and videos. One label which first paid me $600 to shoot a virtually unknown band, dropped to $300 for a much bigger band not even six months later.
Stick to your guns guys. Get paid what you're worth.

Megan E Thompson said...

Also this article should really be a motivator for you guys to work your butts off in college so you leave with a portfolio that will get you work! Because I can guarantee that you won't have the same amount of time and resources as you do now to create new work after you leave MSU.

Kelly Gorham said...

This really started to become a problem in the 1990's. It's traumatized the whole industry. All the better reason to become involved with organizations like ASMP that fight for the rights of working photographers.

Jace said...

right on jackson!